Tag Archives: Tim Brown

Oakland Raiders RB Latavius Murray Selected To First Pro Bowl

Photo by Shawn Jonas

ALAMEDA, Calif.Oakland Raiders RB Latavius Murray was named to his first Pro Bowl, the NFL announced Sunday. Murray, who was originally selected as an alternate, replaces Carolina Panthers RB Jonathan Stewart, who will be participating in the Super Bowl.

Murray joins teammates S Charles Woodson, FB Marcel Reece, DE Khalil Mack, QB Derek Carr and WR Amari Cooper as selections to the NFL’s all-star game, to be played at Honolulu’s Aloha Stadium on Jan. 31. In December, Murray, Cooper and Carr and were named alternates for the Pro Bowl, and Carr and Cooper were named as replacements last week.

The Raiders’ six Pro Bowl selections mark the team’s most since having six in 1994. The selections that season were WR/KR Tim Brown, G Kevin Gogan, QB Jeff Hostetler, CB Terry McDaniel, DT Chester McGlockton and G Steve Wisniewski. The most Pro Bowl representatives in franchise history came in 1973 and 1974 when the Raiders featured nine Pro Bowlers each year.

Murray became the first Raider since 2010 to rush for 1,000 yards in a season, totaling 1,066 yards on 266 carries (4.0 avg.) and six touchdowns in 2015. His rushing total ranked sixth in the NFL and second among all AFC running backs. The third-year player also ranked third on the team with 41 receptions, totaling 232 yards.

The 6-foot-3, 230-pound running back eclipsed the 100-yard mark twice during the campaign, racking up 139 yards on the ground in a Week 3 victory at Cleveland and posting a 113-yard effort in a Week 8 win over the New York Jets at home. He topped 70 yards rushing in a game on five other occasions during the year.

The native of Nedrow, N.Y., was drafted by the Raiders in the sixth round (184th overall) of the 2013 NFL Draft out of UCF. He spent his rookie year on the reserve/injured list before playing in 15 games with three starts in 2014. He finished his second season with 82 carries for 424 yards and two touchdowns, leading the team with a 5.2-yard rushing average.

Press Release Courtesy of the Oakland Raiders Media Relations

Oakland Raiders WR Amari Cooper Selected To First Pro Bowl

Photo by Shawn Jonas

ALAMEDA, Calif. Oakland Raiders rookie WR Amari Cooper was named to his first Pro Bowl, the NFL announced Thursday. Cooper, who was originally selected as an alternate, replaces New York Jets WR Brandon Marshall.

Cooper joins teammates S Charles Woodson, FB Marcel Reece, DE Khalil Mack and QB Derek Carr as selections to the NFL’s all-star game, to be played at Honolulu’s Aloha Stadium on Jan. 31. In December, Cooper, Carr and RB Latavius Murray were named alternates for the Pro Bowl, and Carr was named as a replacement on Wednesday.

The five Pro Bowl selections for the Raiders mark the most for the team since having five in 2002. Cooper is the third Raiders draft pick in the last two years to be named to the Pro Bowl, joining Mack and Carr. He is the sixth Raiders rookie to make the Pro Bowl, joining Woodson (1998), Tim Brown (1988), Marcus Allen (1982), Ray Guy (1973) and Raymond Chester (1970) on that list.

Cooper led NFL rookies in nearly every receiving category by posting 72 receptions for 1,070 yards (14.9 avg.) with six touchdowns in 2015. He became the first ever Raiders rookie to reach 1,000 receiving yards and set franchise records for receptions and 100-yard games by a rookie with five.

The 6-foot-1, 210-pound wideout led the team in receiving yards and yards per catch, while ranking first among NFL rookies in receptions, receiving yards and tying for first in touchdowns. Additionally, his 72 catches are the most ever by a wide receiver 21 or younger and his yardage total is the second most by a NFL player 21 or younger.

Cooper saw the first of his five 100-yard games come in Week 2 against Baltimore, while also becoming the youngest Raiders wide receiver to catch a touchdown pass. In Week 3 at Cleveland, Cooper became the first Raiders rookie with 100 receiving yards in back-to-back games since James Jett (Nov. 21-28, 1993) and joined DeSean Jackson (2008) as the only NFL rookies in the past 30 years with two 100-yard receiving games in their team’s first three games. Cooper’s five 100-yard games are tied for the second most by a rookie since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger.

The native of Miami, Fla., was tabbed as the Raiders’ first-round draft pick and the fourth-overall selection in the 2015 NFL Draft after a record-setting career at Alabama. He was the highest wide receiver taken in the draft and the first receiver taken by Oakland in the first round since 2009.

Press Release Courtesy of the Oakland Raiders Media Relations

Oakland Raiders Unveil New Preseason Local Broadcast Team; Tim Brown, Matt Millen

All Photos by Shawn Jonas

ALAMEDA, Calif. – The Oakland Raiders will introduce new talent for the team’s three locally televised preseason broadcasts in 2015.

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Veteran announcer Beth Mowins will handle the play-by-play duties and will be joined in the broadcast booth by Tim Brown, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2015, and former Raider and veteran television commentator Matt Millen. Nicole Zaloumis will provide sideline analysis, and JT the Brick will return, serving as host and sideline reporter for the telecasts.

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Mark Davis

“I believe we’ve assembled an all-star team for our preseason broadcast,” said Owner Mark Davis. “It means a lot to this organization that we create a great experience for the Raider Nation, in-stadium and at home.”

“It’s an honor to join the Raiders broadcast team with Tim, Matt, Nicole and JT,” said Mowins. “Calling games for one of the premier franchises in the NFL is a real privilege, especially alongside a Hall of Famer and a four-time Super Bowl champion. The Raiders have always taken pride in being innovative and we are excited to engage with Raider Nation in what promises to be an exciting buildup to the new season.”

Tim Brown

“I’m really looking forward to it,” said Brown. “Not only is it the Raiders, but I’ll be alongside Matt Millen, who took care of me when I first joined the team. I can’t wait to get started.”

Silver and Black Productions, the Raiders’ Emmy Award-winning in-house television production team, will produce and broadcast three of the Raiders’ four preseason tilts via FOX affiliate KTVU-2/KICU-36, beginning with the team’s preseason opener against the St. Louis Rams on Aug. 14 at O.co Coliseum. The Raiders will travel to Minnesota for a preseason contest on Aug. 22 before returning home for a nationally-televised game against the Arizona Cardinals on Aug. 30, to be broadcast on NBC’s Sunday Night Football. Oakland closes out the preseason with a road game at Seattle on Sept. 3.

Mowins has worked with ESPN since 1994, beginning as a commentator for women’s college basketball. She began calling college football on ESPNU in 2005, and currently commentates on NCAA Championships in basketball, softball and volleyball in addition to regular season college football and men’s and women’s basketball.

Brown, who was selected for induction to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in January, played 16 seasons for the Raiders from 1988-2003 and is the fifth-leading receiver in NFL history with 1,094 catches. The 23rd Raider elected to the Hall of Fame, Brown ranks sixth all time in receiving yardage (14,934) and scored 105 career touchdowns. In 2012, Brown joined SiriusXM Radio as a football analyst and host and he currently is a college football analyst for ESPN, as well as a co-host on a CBS radio affiliate in Dallas.

Millen, who entered the NFL as the Silver and Black’s second-round pick in 1980, played 12 seasons with the Raiders, 49ers and Redskins, and was a part of four Super Bowl winning teams. Following his playing career, Millen was an NFL commentator for both CBS and FOX before becoming President and CEO of the Detroit Lions from 2001 to 2008. He returned to broadcasting in 2009 with ESPN, covering both the NFL and college football. He has also served as an analyst and color commentator for NBC, the NFL Network and Westwood One radio. He returned to FOX Sports in May 2015 as the lead game analyst for the Big Ten Network.

Zaloumis is currently the SiriusXM host of B/R Spotlight on Bleacher Report Radio after previously serving as co-host on the NFL Network’s NFL AM show from 2012-14. A Bay Area native, Zaloumis was a host and sideline reporter for the Big Ten Network prior to a stint Comcast SportsNet New England, where she was a main anchor and reporter on the network’s daily show, “Chevrolet SportsNet Central.” She was also a host and reporter in Phoenix and Washington, D.C.

JT the Brick currently hosts a nationally-syndicated talk show on FOX Sports Radio. He has handled preseason sideline reporting duties for the Silver and Black since 2008, has served as the host for the “Raiders Report” television show, and has appeared on numerous national radio and television broadcasts.

The Oakland Raiders Select Alabama Wide Receiver Amari Cooper Fourth-Overall In The 2015 NFL Draft

April 31, 2015 9:58 PM PT

Alameda, California– With the fourth-overall pick in the 2015 NFL Draft, the Oakland Raiders selected WR Amari Cooper (Alabama). The 2014 Fred Biletnikoff Award winner and Hesiman Trophy finalist joins the Silver and Black after a three-year career with the Crimson Tide (2012-14), totaling 228 receptions for 3,463 yards (15.2 avg.) with 31 TDs. Here is some more information on the Raiders’ first-round selection, as well as a closer look at some highlights from Cooper’s illustrious collegiate career.

In three years at Alabama, Cooper emerged as one of the nation’s most explosive and polished receivers. Below is a look at his offensive totals at Alabama.

RECEIVING

Year      School       Games     Rec     Yds       Avg    TD

2012   Alabama       14             59    1,000    16.9   11

2013   Alabama       12             45      736     16.4      4     

2014   Alabama       14          124    1,727   13.9     16

 TOTALS                       40          228    3,463   15.2    31

AWARDS

2014 Fred Biletnikoff Award winner — Nation’s top wide receiver –

2014 Unanimous All-American and Preseason All-American

2014 SEC Offensive Player of the Year and First Team All-SEC
Third in 2014 Heisman Voting (1,023 points)

2012 Consensus All-American (FWAA, Sporting News, CBSSports.com, CollegeFootballNews.com and Scout.com)

2012 SEC All-Freshman (selected by coaches)

TITLES

Two-time SEC Champion (2012, 2014) – BCS National Champion (20

He had 228 catches for 3,463 yards and 31 touchdowns in three seasons. That includes a standout junior season where he had an NCAA best 1,724 receiving yards.
Here is a brief look at where Cooper’s offensive exploits ranked among his peers in the SEC and NCAA, along with some other notables from his Alabama career:

Receiving Touchdowns

• Ranks first in SEC annals (since 1956) with 31 career TDs
• Finished first in the SEC, and second in the NCAA, with 16 TDs in

2014
• Second in the SEC with 11 TDs as a freshman in 2012, an Alabama freshman record

Receptions

• Ranks third in SEC history (since ‘56) with 228 career receptions
• Topped the SEC and NCAA in 2014 with 124 receptions, setting the

SEC record
• In 2012, finished with 59 cathces, second all-time among Alabama

freshmen

Receiving Yards

• Second all-time in SEC history (since ‘56) with 3,463 yards
• Led the SEC, finishing second in the NCAA, with 1,727 yards in 2014 • His 1,000-yard season in 2012 was good for fifth in the SEC that season, and the third-best yardage total among Alabama freshman

Jack Del Rio, ” Polished”

“The repetitions that he’s had playing the position, running the route tree and doing all the things that he’s done to develop himself, makes him a guy that has that label of being polished,” Del Rio said. “That’s why. He’s earned it.

“It’s rare when you find guys that come into the league and they have that kind of polish on them coming out. Typically, guys have something they haven’t done. He has pretty much done all those things. He knows how to get off press. He knows how to attack defenses, find the soft spots and run the full complement of the route tree. So that sets him apart in terms of the rest of this (draft) class.”

Jack Del Rio answers a question about if you ink Amari Cooper in as a starter from day one.

“I think the way we like to do things is to come in and earn your role and compete,” Del Rio said. “But the expectation level should be high for a young man that comes in that is selected that high in the draft. But he’ll need to prove it on the field and earn it. That’s how, really, it is with everybody. There certainly is a high expectation that goes along with somebody selected that high.”

 

General Manager Reggie McKenzies Comments:

“Cooper was high on our board from the start,” general manager Reggie McKenzie said. “Honestly, it didn’t matter about the position. It was about the player. We thought we had a chance to get a really good player.

“It’s nice when it goes hand in hand, when you have a player that fits one of your needs. It was great when that fell into place.”

Raiders only meeting with Amari Cooper was at the combine. They didn’t bring him in for a workout. They learned about Cooper by talking to people around the Wide Receiver.   They also had some inside knowledge of the player. Linebackers coach Sal Suneri’s son Vinny was a defensive at Alabama with Cooper from 2012-13.

He’s a character player supremely focused on football, but McKenzie also lauded Cooper’s on-field ability, which the Raiders have studied for some time.

“It seems like he can run a route with his eyes closed,” McKenzie said. “He’s exceptionally quick. He’s fast and he understands the game. You can tell the guy’s been playing football and playing that position all his life. You can tell that. He’s an extremely hard worker and you don’t hear any negatives about this guy, so it’s no wonder he’s as good as he is because the intangibles outside of his skill set are extremely high.”

“When Cooper was there, we were excited,” McKenzie said. “We had an idea of kind of how the draft would go, but when Cooper was officially there, it wasn’t a whole lot of debate.”

 

Amari Cooper’s Conference call Q & A

Q: Considering the Raiders weren’t one of the teams that brought you in for a visit, how shocked were you to hear your name called when they were on the clock?

Cooper: “I wasn’t that shocked. I kind of knew they liked me.”

Q: How did you get that feeling that they liked you?

Cooper: “Just talking to them at the combine.”

Q: You were targeted 170-something times last year. As an NFL rookie, you might not be targeted that many times. Is that going to be frustrating for you?

Cooper: “No. I’m just going to work as hard as I can and whatever results yield from that, I’ll be fine with it.”

Q: People talk about how polished you are. What are some of the things that you think you still need to work on most?

Cooper: “Just being consistent in my performance. Looking the ball all the way through every single time, so that I can catch the ball as many times as it’s thrown to me. High-pointing the ball every time. Just the small things to make me a better player.”

Q: Do you know anything about Derek Carr?

Cooper: “From what I’ve heard, he’s a really great, young quarterback. To be honest, I didn’t watch many NFL games last year. What I’ve heard, he’s a really good quarterback and I can’t wait to build a rapport with him.”

Q: How much did Lane Kiffin help you to develop to the player you are?

Cooper: “He wanted to see every player reach their fullest potential. He harped on the small things with me, like looking the ball all the way through and high-pointing the ball so that I can be the best player that I can be.”

Q: How did you develop your approach? Where did that come from?

Cooper: “Just being diligent and conscientious as a receiver. Just trying to be the best I can be. I think for the most part, it’s come because I’ve played this position all my life. Usually when you get a wide receiver at the college level, they haven’t played wide receiver their whole life.”

Q: How young were you when you started playing wide receiver?
Cooper: “Third grade. From the time I started playing football, I’ve always played the same position.”

Q: How did you choose to play wide receiver in the third grade?

Cooper: “I didn’t choose it. I wanted to play running back because when you’re young, all teams really do is run the ball. We had two great running backs, one was the coach’s son and the other one was really good, but they knew I was a great athlete, too, and they used me at receiver.”

Q: One thing that you are better at than most prospects is your route-running. How much of that have you focused on?

Cooper: “I’m a wide receiver. There are only two ways you can get open at wide receiver, your releases and the top of your route. The whole route-running process is really important. I just focused on it and try to be the best that I can at it so I can create as much separation I can for my quarterback.”

Q: Did you watch any specific wide receiver on film to pattern yourself after?

Cooper: “When I started playing wide receiver at a very young age, my coaches tried to teach me how to run a route. I was already good at it because I had been doing it already in my backyard, I just didn’t know what the routes were called. I was pretty good at cutting so it came pretty natural and pretty easy.”

Q: What’s your experience level with California and the Bay Area?

Cooper: “I’ve been there twice just recently. I went there for a Nike shoot and for [ESPN’s] Sports Science. My first time being there was in the past month.”

Q: So, in fourth or fifth grade, you’re in your backyard running routes?

Cooper: “No it was before that. It was when I was like five or six before I started playing organized football. Me and my friends were in the backyard just playing football.”

Q: So you’d just run the routes and they’d throw to you?

Cooper: “Yeah, we would just play against each other. We’d try to guard each other. We had to find ways to get open, that’s what I mean when I say I was already running routes. I was just finding ways to get open. When I had to run a slant route or a comeback route, which the coach called it, I was already familiar with running and getting open so it came easy.”

Q: Would you say it was perfecting your route running that led to your breakout season last year?

Cooper: “It was a combination of different things. I think my mindset is probably the most important thing. Being able to stay positive through whatever injury I had or whatever situation I was going through and focusing on the best player I can be and the best teammate I can be.”

Q: What drew you to football as a kid?

Cooper: “Probably this place called The Barnyard, it was my after school program.”

What They Are Saying

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